Ytterbium and trace element distribution in brain and organic tissues of offspring rats after prenatal and postnatal exposure to ytterbium

Liuxing Feng, Xiao He, Haiqing Xiao, Zijie Li, Fuliang Li, Nianqing Liu, Zhifang Chai, Yuliang Zhao, Zhiyong Zhang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Lanthanides, because of their diversified physical and chemical effects, have been widely used in a number of fields. As a result, more and more lanthanides are entering the environment and eventually accumulating in the human body. Previous studies indicate that the impact of lanthanides on brain function cannot be neglected. Although neurological studies of trace elements are of paramount importance, up to now, little data are provided regarding the status of micronutritional elements in rats after prenatal and long-term exposure to lanthanide. The aim of this study is to determine the ytterbium (Yb) and trace elements distribution in brain and organic tissues of offspring rats after prenatal and long-term exposure to Yb. Wistar rats were exposed to Yb through oral administration at 0,0.1, 2, and 40 mg Yb/kg concentrations from gestation day 0 through 5 mo of age. Concentrations of Yb and other elements (Mg, Ca, Fe, Cu, Mn, and Zn) in the serum, liver, femur, and brain regions (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, cerebellum, and the rest) of offspring rats at the age of 0 d, 25 d, and 5 mo were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The accumulation of Yb in the brain, liver, and femur is observed; moreover, the levels of Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, Ca, and Mg in the brain and organic tissues of offspring rats are also altered after Yb exposure. This disturbance of the homeostasis of trace elements might induce adverse effects on normal physiological functions of the brain and other organs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)89-104
Number of pages16
JournalBiological Trace Element Research
Volume117
Issue number1-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

Keywords

  • Toxicology
  • Trace elements
  • Ytterbium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

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