When things go wrong: The impact of being a statistical outlier in publicly reported coronary artery bypass graft surgery mortality data

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Walter H. Ettinger, Sharon M. Hylka, Robert A. Phillips, Lynn H. Harrison, Jay A. Cyr, Andrew J. Sussman

The public reporting of hospital quality and safety data is a growing phenomenon. Yet there are few reports of the effects of publicly reported data on individual organizations, particularly when the data show worse than expected performance. In this article, our hospital's response to having a mortality rate from coronary artery bypass graft surgery that was significantly higher than other programs in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is reported. The data caused suspension of elective cardiac surgery at the institution, and an independent review of the program was undertaken. The effects of the suspension and publication of mortality data on quality and patient safety, the residency training program in cardiothoracic surgery, and the financial performance of the hospital are described. Several lessons were learned that may be of value to other health care organizations that experience a public crisis in clinical quality. (Am J Med Qual 2008;23:90-95).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-95
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Quality
Volume23
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

PMID: 18245577

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Standard

When things go wrong : The impact of being a statistical outlier in publicly reported coronary artery bypass graft surgery mortality data. / Ettinger, Walter H.; Hylka, Sharon M.; Phillips, Robert A.; Harrison, Lynn H.; Cyr, Jay A.; Sussman, Andrew J.

In: American Journal of Medical Quality, Vol. 23, No. 2, 01.03.2008, p. 90-95.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Ettinger, WH, Hylka, SM, Phillips, RA, Harrison, LH, Cyr, JA & Sussman, AJ 2008, 'When things go wrong: The impact of being a statistical outlier in publicly reported coronary artery bypass graft surgery mortality data' American Journal of Medical Quality, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 90-95. https://doi.org/10.1177/1062860607313141

APA

Ettinger, W. H., Hylka, S. M., Phillips, R. A., Harrison, L. H., Cyr, J. A., & Sussman, A. J. (2008). When things go wrong: The impact of being a statistical outlier in publicly reported coronary artery bypass graft surgery mortality data. American Journal of Medical Quality, 23(2), 90-95. https://doi.org/10.1177/1062860607313141

Vancouver

Ettinger WH, Hylka SM, Phillips RA, Harrison LH, Cyr JA, Sussman AJ. When things go wrong: The impact of being a statistical outlier in publicly reported coronary artery bypass graft surgery mortality data. American Journal of Medical Quality. 2008 Mar 1;23(2):90-95. https://doi.org/10.1177/1062860607313141

Author

Ettinger, Walter H. ; Hylka, Sharon M. ; Phillips, Robert A. ; Harrison, Lynn H. ; Cyr, Jay A. ; Sussman, Andrew J. / When things go wrong : The impact of being a statistical outlier in publicly reported coronary artery bypass graft surgery mortality data. In: American Journal of Medical Quality. 2008 ; Vol. 23, No. 2. pp. 90-95.

BibTeX

@article{2651ad941d7548b3be38fa188f717184,
title = "When things go wrong: The impact of being a statistical outlier in publicly reported coronary artery bypass graft surgery mortality data",
abstract = "The public reporting of hospital quality and safety data is a growing phenomenon. Yet there are few reports of the effects of publicly reported data on individual organizations, particularly when the data show worse than expected performance. In this article, our hospital's response to having a mortality rate from coronary artery bypass graft surgery that was significantly higher than other programs in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is reported. The data caused suspension of elective cardiac surgery at the institution, and an independent review of the program was undertaken. The effects of the suspension and publication of mortality data on quality and patient safety, the residency training program in cardiothoracic surgery, and the financial performance of the hospital are described. Several lessons were learned that may be of value to other health care organizations that experience a public crisis in clinical quality. (Am J Med Qual 2008;23:90-95).",
keywords = "Cardiac surgery, Mortality rates, Performance improvement, Public reporting",
author = "Ettinger, {Walter H.} and Hylka, {Sharon M.} and Phillips, {Robert A.} and Harrison, {Lynn H.} and Cyr, {Jay A.} and Sussman, {Andrew J.}",
year = "2008",
month = "3",
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doi = "10.1177/1062860607313141",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "23",
pages = "90--95",
journal = "American Journal of Medical Quality",
issn = "1062-8606",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Inc.",
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}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - When things go wrong

T2 - American Journal of Medical Quality

AU - Ettinger, Walter H.

AU - Hylka, Sharon M.

AU - Phillips, Robert A.

AU - Harrison, Lynn H.

AU - Cyr, Jay A.

AU - Sussman, Andrew J.

PY - 2008/3/1

Y1 - 2008/3/1

N2 - The public reporting of hospital quality and safety data is a growing phenomenon. Yet there are few reports of the effects of publicly reported data on individual organizations, particularly when the data show worse than expected performance. In this article, our hospital's response to having a mortality rate from coronary artery bypass graft surgery that was significantly higher than other programs in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is reported. The data caused suspension of elective cardiac surgery at the institution, and an independent review of the program was undertaken. The effects of the suspension and publication of mortality data on quality and patient safety, the residency training program in cardiothoracic surgery, and the financial performance of the hospital are described. Several lessons were learned that may be of value to other health care organizations that experience a public crisis in clinical quality. (Am J Med Qual 2008;23:90-95).

AB - The public reporting of hospital quality and safety data is a growing phenomenon. Yet there are few reports of the effects of publicly reported data on individual organizations, particularly when the data show worse than expected performance. In this article, our hospital's response to having a mortality rate from coronary artery bypass graft surgery that was significantly higher than other programs in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts is reported. The data caused suspension of elective cardiac surgery at the institution, and an independent review of the program was undertaken. The effects of the suspension and publication of mortality data on quality and patient safety, the residency training program in cardiothoracic surgery, and the financial performance of the hospital are described. Several lessons were learned that may be of value to other health care organizations that experience a public crisis in clinical quality. (Am J Med Qual 2008;23:90-95).

KW - Cardiac surgery

KW - Mortality rates

KW - Performance improvement

KW - Public reporting

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U2 - 10.1177/1062860607313141

DO - 10.1177/1062860607313141

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EP - 95

JO - American Journal of Medical Quality

JF - American Journal of Medical Quality

SN - 1062-8606

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 16806421