Variations in corticomotor and somatosensory evoked potentials: Effects of temperature, halothane anesthesia, and arterial partial pressure of CO2

J. L. Browning, M. L. Heizer, David S. Baskin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of temperature, halothane concentration, and arterial partial pressure of CO2 on corticomotor evoked potentials (CMEPs) and somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) were studied. Hypothermia causes an increase in CMEP and SSEP latencies. Corticomotor evoked potential amplitude increases with hypothermia to reach a maximum at or below 28°C. As the temperature decreases from 42°C, SSEP amplitude initially increases to reach a maximum between 36 and 34°C and then decreases with further reductions in temperature. Increased arterial partial pressure of CO2 decreases amplitude and increases latencies of the CMEPs and SSEPs. The concentration of halothane has no effect on CMEP amplitude or latency. However, SSEP amplitude is inversely related to halothane concentration, and SSEP latency is directly related to halothane concentration. These results suggest that physiologic variables must be carefully measured when evoked potentials are utilized in any animal or human study. Moreover, each type of evoked potential has a unique response to alterations of these variables.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)643-648
Number of pages6
JournalAnesthesia and Analgesia
Volume74
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

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