Variability in the size of the retroperitoneal oblique corridor: A magnetic resonance imaging-based analysis

Zain Boghani, William Steele, Sean Barber, Jonathan J. Lee, Olumide Sokunbi, J. Bob Blacklock, Todd Trask, Paul Holman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: A minimally invasive approach to the L2-S1 disc spaces through a single, left-sided, retroperitoneal oblique corridor has been previously described. However, the size of this corridor varies, limiting access to the disc space in certain patients. Here, the authors retrospectively reviewed lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 300 patients to better define the size and variability of the retroperitoneal oblique corridor. Methods: Lumbar spine MRI from 300 patients was reviewed. The size of the retroperitoneal oblique corridor from L2-S1 was measured. It was defined as the (1) distance between the medial aspect of the aorta and the lateral aspect of the psoas muscle from L2-L5 and (2) the distance between the midpoint of the L5-S1 disc and the medial aspect of the nearest major vessel on the left at L5-S1. In addition, the rostral-caudal location of the iliac bifurcation was measured. Results: The size of the retroperitoneal oblique corridor at L2/3, L3/4, L4/5, and L5/S1 was, respectively, 17.3 ± 6.4 mm, 16.2 ± 6.3 mm, 14.8 ± 7.8 cm, and 13.0 ± 8.3 mm. The incidence of corridor size <1 cm at L2/3, L3/4, L4/5, and L5/S1 was 10.3%, 16.0%, 30.0%, and 39.3%, respectively. The iliac bifurcation was most commonly found behind the L4 vertebral body (n = 158, 52.67%) followed by the L4/5 disc space (n = 74, 24.67%). Conclusion: The size of the retroperitoneal oblique corridor diminishes in a rostral-caudal direction, often limiting access to the L4/5 and L5/S1 disc spaces.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number54
JournalSurgical Neurology International
Volume11
Issue number54
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 28 2020

Keywords

  • Fusion
  • Lumbar interbody fusion
  • Magnetic resonance imaging
  • Minimally invasive surgical
  • Oblique lumbar interbody fusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

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