UV radiation resistance-associated gene (UVRAG) promotes cell proliferation, migration, invasion by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK) and integrin-β/Src signaling in breast cancer cells

Sevide Sencan, Mine Tanriover, Mustafa Ulasli, Didem Karakas, Bulent Ozpolat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous group of human cancer with distinct genetic, biological and clinicopathological features. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is the most aggressive and metastatic type of breast cancer and associated with poor patient survival. However, the role of UV Radiation Resistance-Associated Gene (UVRAG) in TNBC remains unknown. Here, we report that UVRAG is highly upregulated in all TNBC cells and its knockdown leads to the inhibition of cell proliferation, colony formation and progression of cell cycle, which is associated with and reduced expression of cell cycle related protein expression, including Cyclin A2, B1, D1, cdc2 and cdk6 in TNBC cells. Inhibition of UVRAG also suppressed cell motility, migration and invasion of TNBC cells by inhibition of Integrin β1 and β3 and Src activity. Our findings suggest for the first time that UVRAG expression contributes to proliferation, cell cycle progression, motility/migration and invasion of TNBC cells. Thus, targeting UVRAG could be a potential strategy in breast cancer especially against TNBC.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2075-2084
Number of pages10
JournalMolecular and Cellular Biochemistry
Volume476
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2021

Keywords

  • Autophagy
  • Invasion
  • Proliferation
  • Survival
  • Triple-negative breast cancer
  • UVRAG

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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