Understanding the associations between smoking-related risk perception, interest in quitting smoking, and interest in lung cancer screening among homeless adult smokers

Pooja Agrawal, Matthew Taing, Tzu An Chen, Sean M. Reuven, Michael S. Businelle, Darla E. Kendzor, Eric H. Bernicker, Lorraine R. Reitzel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Individuals experiencing homelessness smoke cigarettes at high rates, suffer a disproportionate incidence of lung cancer, but are unlikely to be screened to enhance early detection. Understanding correlates of lung cancer screening (LCS) interest within this vulnerable group may lend insight into prevention and treatment efforts and reduce their smoking-related morbidity and mortality. This study sought to understand how risk perception and interest in quitting smoking relate to LCS interest among homeless adults. Participants comprised a convenience sample of CO-verified current smokers (N = 310; 72.6% men, Mage = 43 + 11.7) from a homeless shelter in Dallas, TX. Participants self-reported risk perception, interest in quitting smoking, and interest in LCS. The average risk perception was 6.7 + 3.2 (range 0–10), 74.8% (n = 232) agreed or strongly agreed with interest in LCS, and 65.8% (n = 204) were interested in quitting smoking. Greater interest in quitting smoking, but not greater risk perception, was associated with greater interest in LCS (adjusted OR: 1.968, (95% CI: 1.213, 3.191), p = 0.006). Risk perception and interest in quitting smoking did not interact in their association with interest in LCS. Results suggest that homeless smokers with an interest in quitting may be receptive to LCS: a diagnostic tool by which cancers can be caught at earlier stages and prior to metastasis. However, few in the current sample would be eligible for LCS based on current guidelines; results have implications for altered screening practices among chronic smokers experiencing homelessness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number8817
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalInternational journal of environmental research and public health
Volume17
Issue number23
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2020

Keywords

  • Homeless
  • Lung cancer
  • Lung cancer screening
  • Smoking

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pollution
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

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