Two-dimensional chemotherapy simulations demonstrate fundamental transport and tumor response limitations involving nanoparticles

J. Sinek, H. Frieboes, X. Zheng, V. Cristini

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

We present multiscale computer simulations of the delivery of chemotherapy and the tumor cells' response to the therapy. Even in a best-case scenario of: constant drug release from the nanoparticles; one cell type, which is drug-sensitive and does not develop resistance; targeted nanoparticle delivery; and for model parameters calibrated to ensure sufficient drug or nanoparticle blood concentration to rapidly kill all cells in vitro; our analysis shows that convective and diffusive transport limitations in vivo are severe and that drug levels inside the tumor are far less than in vitro, leaving large parts of the tumor with inadequate drug concentration. The in vivo rate of tumor shrinkage is several orders of magnitude less than in vitro, and after some shrinkage the tumor may achieve a new mass equilibrium far above detectable levels. Adjuvant anti-angiogenic therapy "normalizing" the vasculature may ameliorate transport limitations, although leading to unwanted tumor fragmentation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2005 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show - NSTI Nanotech 2005 Technical Proceedings
EditorsM. Laudon, B. Romanowicz
Pages120-123
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event2005 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show - NSTI Nanotech 2005 - Anaheim, CA, United States
Duration: May 8 2005May 12 2005

Other

Other2005 NSTI Nanotechnology Conference and Trade Show - NSTI Nanotech 2005
CountryUnited States
CityAnaheim, CA
Period5/8/055/12/05

Keywords

  • Chemotherapy
  • Computer simulation
  • Nanoparticles
  • Tumor fragmentation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Two-dimensional chemotherapy simulations demonstrate fundamental transport and tumor response limitations involving nanoparticles'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this