Turning brain into blood: A hematopoietic fate adopted by adult neural stem cells in vivo

Christopher R.R. Bjornson, Rodney L. Rietze, Brent A. Reynolds, M. Cristina Magli, Angelo L. Vescovi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1269 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stem cells are found in various organs where they participate in tissue homeostasis by replacing differentiated cells lost to physiological turnover or injury. An investigation was performed to determine whether stem cells are restricted to produce specific cell types, namely, those from the tissue in which they reside. After transplantation into irradiated hosts, genetically labeled neural stem cells were found to produce a variety of blood cell types including myeloid and lymphoid cells as well as early hematopoietic cells. Thus, neural stem cells appear to have a wider differentiation potential than previously thought.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)534-537
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume283
Issue number5401
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 22 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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