Trends in Geospatial Drivers of Fall-Related Hospitalizations and Asset Mapping of Fall Prevention Interventions for Vulnerable Older Adults

Samuel D. Towne, Matthew Lee Smith, Minjie Xu, Sungmin Lee, Sushma Sharma, Don Smith, Yajuan Li, Yasmin Fucci, Marcia G. Ory

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Given that one in four older adults suffer potentially preventable falls annually, we aimed to identify areas with (a) delivery gaps of evidence-based programs (EBPs) targeting fall prevention among older adults, namely A Matter of Balance (AMOB), and (b) high rates of fall-related hospitalizations—hotspots. Method: Analyses included multiple geospatially linked datasets. Results: EBPs were delivered ≥1 time in 84 counties in 2012 and 90 counties in 2014. Factors associated with EPB delivery gaps (absence; p<.05) included high-density older adult areas, non-fall-related hospitalization hotspots, lower population density, nonmetropolitan areas, high-density Hispanic adult areas, and areas with limited access to home health care agencies. Hotspots for fall-related hospitalization numbered 64 in 2012 and 62 in 2014. Factors associated with hotspots included low-density older adult areas, having AMOB delivered ≥1 time annually, high population density, and high-density Hispanic adult areas. Discussion: In resource-finite settings (e.g., the aging services sector), identifying high priority areas allows for precise allocation of limited resources.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)328-339
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume32
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2020

Keywords

  • falls
  • health
  • health policy
  • public policy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

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