Translocation of inhaled TiO2 nanoparticles along olfactory nervous system to brain studied by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence

Jiang Xue Wang, Chun Ying Chen, Jin Sun, Hong Wei Yu, Yu Feng Li, Bai Li, Li Xing, Yu Ying Huang, Wei He, Yu Xi Gao, Zhi Fang Chai, Yu Liang Zhao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nanosized TiO2 is widely used for cleaning air, antibacterial and decomposing organic in wastewater for its highly photocatalytic function. TiO2 inhalation via respiratory tracts is the most common route of its exposure in industry and environment. After inhalation by human or rodents, TiO2 can induce inflammation and pulmonary lesions, which was reported to even cause lung cancer by long-term exposure. In this paper, Synchrotron Radiation X-ray Fluorescence was employed to investigate the distribution of TiO2 in the olfactory bulb and brain of mice after inhalation of TiO2 particles suspension. The results showed that TiO2 could enter the olfactory nerve layer (ON), granular cell layer of olfactory bulb (Gro), and olfactory ventricle (OV) and further the hippocampus, thalamus, and CA3 area of the brain through the olfactory nervous system. The distribution area of microsized TiO2 was wider than that of nanosized TiO2.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)76-79
Number of pages4
JournalKao Neng Wu Li Yu Ho Wu Li/High Energy Physics and Nuclear Physics
Volume29
Issue numberSUPPL.
StatePublished - Dec 2005

Keywords

  • Elemental distribution
  • Mouse brain
  • Nano-TiO
  • Nanosafety
  • SRXRF

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)
  • Nuclear and High Energy Physics

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