Transfer of humoral immunity against cytomegalovirus proteins following transplantation of T‐cell‐depleted allogeneic bone marrow from seropositive donors

Donna M. Roy, Malcolm K. Brenner, Derek Cook, R. Ian Duncan, Paul D. Griffiths, Jane E. Grundy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Previous work by Grob et al. [Lancet i: 774, 1987] has demonstrated that allogeneic, T-cell-depleted bone marrow transplant recipients have a better prognosis for reactivated cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection if their donor is also immune. It was proposed that adoptively transferred humoral immunity was responsible for the protective effect of active infection. Immunoblot analysis using purified virions was used here to examine pre- and posttransplant antibody responses of seropositive recipients who had undergone active viral infection after transplantation. Immunoblots were assessed for the numbers of polypeptides recognised and reactivity against individual polypeptides. Immunoblots were also scanned by quantitative densitometry, and the intensity of antibody responses against total viral protein and individual polypeptides was determined. Sera from recipients with immune donors exhibited a secondary-type immune response in terms of both intensity and polypeptide specific pattern of antibody reactivity, compared with those recipients with nonimmune donors. In particular, recipients with immune donors appeared to show a greater reactivity against a protein of Mr 55,000; this may represent the envelope glycoprotein gB, which is a major target for neutralising antibodies, and might also be utilised for preparing an effective vaccine for CMV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)150-158
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Medical Virology
Volume41
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1993

Keywords

  • Immunoblotting
  • Quantitative densitometry
  • Virus reactivation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

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