The Women's Health Initiative. What is on trial: Nutrition and chronic disease? Or misinterpreted science, media havoc and the sound of silence from peers?

Agneta Yngve, Leif Hambraeus, Lauren Lissner, Lluis Serra Majem, Maria Daniel Vaz De Almeida, Christina Berg, Roger Hughes, Geoffrey Cannon, Inga Thorsdottir, John Kearney, Jan Åke Gustafsson, Joseph Rafter, Ibrahim Elmadfa, Nick Kennedy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

The first results of the Women's Health Initiative dietary intervention trial were published in the USA in February. This is a colossal intervention designed to see if diets lower in fat and higher in fruits, vegetables and grains than is usual in high-income countries reduce the incidence of breast cancer, colorectal cancer, heart disease and other chronic diseases, in women aged 50-79 years. As interpreted by US government media releases, the results were unimpressive. As interpreted by a global media blitz, the results indicate that food and nutrition has little or nothing to do with health and disease. But the trial was in key respects not reaching its aims, was methodologically controversial, and in any case has not produced the reported null results. What should the public health nutrition profession do about such messes?

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)269-272
Number of pages4
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume9
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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