The use of a self-generation memory encoding strategy to improve verbal memory and learning in patients with traumatic brain injury

Bruce K. Schefft, Mario F. Dulay, Jamison D. Fargo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

The generation effect refers to the theory that optimal acquisition and retention of information is achieved by active participation rather than by passive observation. The efficacy of a self-generation memory encoding strategy was tested using a verbal paired-associate task for free recall, cued recall, and recognition memory in 40 traumatically brain-injured outpatients in two studies. In study #1, self-generation encoding procedures improved recognition memory, but not free recall, compared with the didactic presentation of information. In study #2, self-generation procedures improved cued recall test performance, but the results demonstrated that the type of cue that is provided moderates the efficacy of self-generation procedures. Results provide preliminary empirical support for the use of self-generation encoding procedures in improving upon verbal memory and learning abilities in individuals with TBI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-68
Number of pages8
JournalApplied Neuropsychology
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008

Keywords

  • Generation effect
  • Learning
  • Memory
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Verbal paired associates

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

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