The ribosome as a table-driven convolutional decoder for the Escherichia coli K-12 translation initiation system

Elebeoba May, M. A. Vouk, D. L. Bitzer, D. I. Rosnick

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Redundancy occurs naturally within RNA and DNA sequences [1]. The existence of tandem repeats, and sequences such as the Shine-Dalgarno sequence, the Pribnow box and the TATA box, leads us to believe that cellular communication systems use some method of coding to recognize valid information regions within a nucleotide sequence and correct for "transmission" errors such as mutations. In this paper we use principles of convolutional coding theory to analyze the translation initiation process. The principle hypothesis is that the messenger RNA (mRNA) sequence can be viewed as a noisy, convolutionaly encoded signal. The ribosome is functionally paralleled to a table-driven convolutional decoder. The 16s ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequence is used to form decoding masks for table-driven decoding. The results of applying this method to Escherichia coli K-12 strain MG1655 are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2466-2469
Number of pages4
JournalAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Volume4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000
Event22nd Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society - Chicago, IL, United States
Duration: Jul 23 2000Jul 28 2000

Keywords

  • Coding theory
  • Convolutional codes
  • Table-driven codes
  • Translation initiation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Signal Processing
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition
  • Health Informatics

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