The healthcare resource utilization and costs of chronic lung allograft dysfunction following lung transplantation in patients with commercial insurance in the United States

Ajay Sheshadri, Naomi C. Sacks, Bridget Healey, Phil Cyr, Gerhard Boerner, Howard J. Huang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Aims: Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD), a common complication of lung transplantation, is the leading cause of death for lung transplant recipients. While data on lung transplant costs are available, the impact of CLAD on healthcare resource use (HRU) and cost is not well understood. The primary objective was to quantify the HRU and costs of CLAD in the US using real-world data. Methods: A longitudinal retrospective analysis was performed of commercial claims data from the IQVIA PharMetrics Plus database for patients aged 18–64 who underwent lung transplantation between January 1, 2006 and September 30, 2018. Lung transplantation was identified using International Classification of Disease and Common Procedure Terminology procedure codes. Patients studied were observable for at least 12 months before and after transplantation. Patients who developed CLAD were identified using novel, diagnosis codes for incident lung disease at least one year following transplantation. Descriptive analyses were conducted to assess the study’s outcomes prior to and following a CLAD diagnosis. All-cause HRU and costs, the study’s primary outcomes, leading up to and following CLAD diagnosis were calculated. Results: Among 129 transplant patients who developed CLAD, healthcare costs were substantially higher in the year following diagnosis ($198,113), compared to the year leading to diagnosis ($85,276). Inpatient admissions were responsible for most costs in years 1 and 2 following diagnosis ($99,372 and $83,348 respectively). Drug costs were higher in the 12 months post-index, compared to the 12 months pre-index ($3,600 vs $2,527). Limitations: Claims data do not include clinical data, have limits determining loss of follow-up, and do not provide granularity to determine disease severity. Also, there is no ICD-10-CM code specific to CLAD or BOS. Conclusions: CLAD after lung transplant is associated with substantial HRU and costs. Further work is needed to develop interventions that reduce this impact.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)650-659
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Medical Economics
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Keywords

  • bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome
  • chronic lung allograft dysfunction
  • healthcare resource utilization
  • lung transplantation
  • real world evidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy

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