The happy survivor? Effects of differential mortality on life satisfaction in older age

Suzanne C Segerstrom, Hannah L Combs, Ashley Winning, Julia K Boehm, Laura D Kubzansky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Older adults report higher psychological well-being than younger adults. Those highest in well-being also have the lowest risk of mortality. If those with lower well-being die earlier, it could affect the appearance of developmental change in well-being. In adults aged 50 and older (N = 4,458), we estimated effects of differential mortality on life satisfaction by imputing life satisfaction, adjusting for attrition due to death, or estimating life satisfaction using pattern-mixture modeling. There was an increase in life satisfaction with age; however, differential mortality affected the elevation of the curve. Observed life satisfaction, particularly above age 70, is affected by differential mortality. (PsycINFO Database Record

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)340-5
Number of pages6
JournalPsychology and Aging
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2016

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Aging/psychology
  • Female
  • Happiness
  • Humans
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Personal Satisfaction
  • Survival Rate

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