The distribution profile and oxidation states of biometals in APP transgenic mouse brain: Dyshomeostasis with age and as a function of the development of Alzheimer's disease

Huajian Wang, Meng Wang, Bing Wang, Ming Li, Hanqing Chen, Xiaohan Yu, Yuliang Zhao, Weiyue Feng, Zhifang Chai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

The enrichment of transition metals in the brain and the dyshomeostasis of metals are thought to be important etiological factors for elderly people in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the understanding of how biometals dynamically dysregulate in the stages of AD development, such as the exact time-dependent and site-dependent accumulation in the brain with AD progression, is still limited. Herein, by using the APP/V717I transgenic mouse model and age-matched mice as control, we offer distinctive in situ and quantitative images of metals (Cu, Fe, Zn and Ca) in brain sections by synchrotron radiation micro beam X-ray fluorescence (SR-μXRF). The images show that Fe and Ca increased with brain aging in both AD and control (CNT) mice, and Cu, Fe, Zn and Ca appeared significantly elevated in AD mice and showed an obvious age-dependent rise. Fe, Cu and Zn were obviously specifically enriched in the cortex and hippocampus, which were also the plaque-formation sensitive brain regions. Our results demonstrate that the enrichment of transition metals with age and metals' dyshomeostasis in specific regions may contribute together to the etiology and development of AD in elderly people. The XANES measurements of Cu and Fe show evidence that Cu may have redox properties in the AD brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)289-296
Number of pages8
JournalMetallomics
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry (miscellaneous)
  • Biophysics
  • Biomaterials
  • Biochemistry
  • Metals and Alloys

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