Symptom Patterns and Service Use Among African American and Caucasian Veterans With Combat-Related PTSD

B. Christopher Frueh, Jon D. Elhai, Jeannine Monnier, Mark B. Hamner, Rebecca G. Knapp

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

African American (N = 57) and Caucasian (N = 76) combat veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at a Veterans Affairs (VA) outpatient PTSD treatment clinic were compared on variables related to clinical symptoms and VA service use. Groups were compared on relevant interview (e.g., Clinician Administered PTSD Scale; D. D. Blake et al. 1990) and self-report measures (e.g., Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2; J. N. Butcher, W. G. Dahlstrom, J. R. Graham, A. Tellegen, & B. Kaemmer, 1989). Groups were also compared on demographics, psychiatric comorbidity, VA service use, and disability status. Results revealed few significant between-groups differences, providing further evidence that African American and Caucasian veterans with PTSD do not differ in manifestation of the syndrome or in use of VA services and benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-30
Number of pages9
JournalPsychological Services
Volume1
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2004

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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