Surgical removal of subfoveal choroidal neovascularization without removal of posterior hyaloid: A consecutive series in younger patients

E. S. Lit, Rosa Y. Kim, D. J. D'Amico

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: Subfoveal choroidal neovascularization (CNV) remains a common and important cause of visual loss. Previous studies have suggested that submacular surgery may improve or maintain visual acuity, particularly in younger patients. The majority of reported cases included removal of the posterior hyaloid during vitrectomy. The authors present a consecutive series of patients age 55 or younger with subfoveal CNV removal without posterior hyaloid removal. Methods: Seventeen patients without age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), with subfoveal CNV from choroiditis, presumed ocular histoplasmosis syndrome, myopia, or idiopathic causes, underwent a small retinotomy technique to extract the membranes after vitrectomy without posterior hyaloid removal. Results: Median improvement in visual acuity was from 20/320 to 20/50. Eleven patients (65%) experienced an improvement of three or more lines of Snellen acuity (average 7.5), 4 (23%) were within two lines of preoperative acuity, and 2 (12%) had decreased acuity, with an average follow-up of 12 months (range 3-31). Choroidal neovascularization recurred in six patients (35%). Postoperative retinal detachment, epiretinal proliferation, or macular hole did not occur. Conclusions: In this series of younger patients with subfoveal CNV not from ARMD, visual acuity was improved in the majority after submacular membrane removal. Omission of removal of the posterior hyaloid did not adversely affect outcome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-323
Number of pages7
JournalRetina
Volume21
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

Keywords

  • Choroidal neovascularization
  • Submacular surgery
  • Subretinal surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ophthalmology
  • Sensory Systems

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