Sociability and attachment as distinct domains of the interpersonal relationships factor of the BASIS-24

Jon G. Allen, James Chris Fowler, B. Christopher Frueh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Behavior and Symptom Identification Scale (BASIS-24) was administered to 1972 patients in a private psychiatric hospital specializing in intensive treatment of several weeks' duration. The study was designed to investigate the factor structure in a large inpatient population with a high burden of psychiatric illness. While largely replicating previous factor analyses, the study unexpectedly yielded two factors from the items comprising the interpersonal relationships factor, which were interpreted as assessing sociability and attachment. These two new factors showed differential relationships with other measures of interpersonal functioning (Inventory of Interpersonal Problems) and attachment (Relationship Questionnaire), and both factors were sensitive to improvement over the course of intensive inpatient treatment. These results suggest that different treatment interventions might be employed to target these two separable domains of potentially problematic interpersonal functioning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1203-1209
Number of pages7
JournalComprehensive Psychiatry
Volume54
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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