Single-photon emission computed tomography in human immunodeficiency virus encephalopathy: A preliminary report

J. C. Masdeu, A. Yudd, R. L. Van Heertum, M. Grundman, E. Hriso, R. A. O'Connell, D. Luck, U. Camli, L. N. King

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

Depression or psychosis in a previously asymptomatic individual infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may be psychogenic, related to brain involvement by the HIV or both. Although prognosis and treatment differ depending on etiology, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are usually unrevealing in early HIV encephalopathy and therefore cannot differentiate it from psychogenic conditions. Thirty of 32 patients (94%) with HIV encephalopathy had single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) findings that differed from the findings in 15 patients with non-HIV psychoses and 6 controls. SPECT showed multifocal cortical and subcortical areas of hypoperfusion. In 4 cases, cognitive improvement after 6-8 weeks of zidovudine (AZT) therapy was reflected in amelioration of SPECT findings. CT remained unchanged. SPECT may be a useful technique for the evaluation of HIV encephalopathy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1471-1475
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Nuclear Medicine
Volume32
Issue number8
StatePublished - 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

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