Single agent therapy for infections in cancer patients: A prospective randomized trial comparing three extended-spectrum cephalosporins

K. V.I. Rolston, P. G. Jones, Victor Fainstein, N. M. Khardori, E. J. Anaissie, L. Steelhammer, G. P. Bodey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Three hundred and twenty patients were enrolled in a prospective randomized trial comparing cefoperazone, ceftizoxime and ceftriaxone for initial therapy of infectious episodes in cancer patients. Patients with neutropenia were excluded. In 286 evaluable episodes, the response rates associated with the three agents were 77 % for cefoperazone, 70 % for ceftizoxime and 72 % for ceftriaxone, with no statistically significant differences between the three treatment groups. The overall response rate for all episodes of pneumonia (64 %) was significantly lower than the response rate for all other infections (81 %; p=0.002), and the mortality associated with pneumonia (9 %) was higher than that associated with all other episodes (2 %; p=0.01). Patients with infections due to gram-negative organisms responded well to all three agents, whereas patients with gram-positive infections responded more favorably to cefoperazone. Two different schedules of ceftriaxone were used. The clinical response did not differ significantly between patients receiving ceftriaxone once daily and those receiving it twice daily. The incidence of superinfection and relapse was extremely low and all three agents were well tolerated. It is concluded that extended spectrum cephalosporins are effective as single agents for the treatment of infections in cancer patients with adequate neutrophil counts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-145
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases
Volume10
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 1991

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases

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