Short and long-term transfer of training in a tablet-based teen driver hazard perception training program

Nima Ahmadi, Aftefeh Katrahmani, Matthew R. Romoser

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Engaged Driver Training System (EDTS) is a tablet-based training method which was developed to elevate hazard perception skills of teen drivers. The objective was to investigate the effectiveness of the EDTS training program on drivers' hazard perception skills in driving situations. Drivers' situation awareness was measured by mapping eye movements and verbal protocols of teen drivers to Endsley's model of situation awareness. Thirty-two drivers were randomly assigned to two groups: the experimental and placebo group. Drivers' situation awareness was first measured at one week and six months after training via an 8-mile on road drive. The situation awareness of drivers in two groups were compared with each other's in four categories of driving scenarios: crosswalks, turns, 4-way intersections, and rotary. Results show that in most of the categories the EDTS training had both short-term and long-term positive effects on drivers' hazard perception skills.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages1965-1969
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781510889538
StatePublished - 2018
Event62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018 - Philadelphia, United States
Duration: Oct 1 2018Oct 5 2018

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume3
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other62nd Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Annual Meeting, HFES 2018
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityPhiladelphia
Period10/1/1810/5/18

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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