Setting Expectations for ECMO: Improving Communication Between Clinical Teams and Decision Makers

Ashley L. Stephens, Courtenay Bruce

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Transplant medicine is fraught with clinical-ethical issues. It is not uncommon to have ethicists on transplant teams to help navigate ethically complex cases and ethical questions. Clinical ethicists work in hospitals and/or other healthcare institutions identifying and addressing value-laden conflict and ethical uncertainties. As ethicists, we set out to describe our process and involvement in cases involving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Our work centers on monitoring and optimizing communication among clinicians, families, and patients, with the goals of (1) aligning patient/family understanding of the nature and purpose of ECMO while encouraging realistic expectations for possible outcomes, and (2) proactively mitigating the moral distress of providers involved in complex ECMO cases. We close with recommendations for how to measure the impact of ethicists' involvement in ECMO cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)120-125
Number of pages6
JournalMethodist DeBakey cardiovascular journal
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Keywords

  • decision making
  • ECMO
  • end of life
  • ethics
  • extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
  • mechanical circulatory support

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Setting Expectations for ECMO: Improving Communication Between Clinical Teams and Decision Makers'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this