Self-Perceptions and Factors Associated With Being Put Down at School Among Middle and High School Students

Ashley Bowman, Jennifer M. Knack, Adam E. Barry, Ashley L. Merianos, Kelly L. Wilson, E. Lisako J. McKyer, Matthew Lee Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study assessed the prevalence of verbally being put down by others and intrapersonal and normative factors associated with being put down by others among middle and high school students. Students (N = 1,027) completed the Adolescent Health Risk Behavior Survey. Over 16% of participants reported being put down at school. Students who identified with the negative words confused, unattractive, dull, and careless and identified less with the positive words popular, smart, considerate, cool, and self-confident reported being put down by others. High school students were less likely to be put down. As students scored higher on the Negative Self-Description Scale, their odds of being put down increased. As students scored higher on the Positive Self-Description Scale, their odds of being put down decreased. Students who perceived their friends drinking alcohol regularly were less likely to be put down. Strategies to enhance self-perceptions to raise self-awareness and form healthy/positive identities are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)270-279
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of School Nursing
Volume37
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2021

Keywords

  • bullying
  • emotional health
  • school nurse
  • self-perceptions
  • victimization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing (miscellaneous)

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