Saphenous vein graft conduits for insertion of hepatic arterial infusion pumps in patients with abnormal hepatic arterial anatomy

Maksym Yezhelyev, Michael Osgood, Vasili Egnatashvili, Alan Lumsden, Charles A. Staley, David A. Kooby

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and Objectives: Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy offers improved hepatic control for liver metastases from colon cancer. Optimal catheter insertion requires an adequate gastroduodenal artery (GDA). Limited data exists on using saphenous vein grafts (SVG) as conduits when native vasculature is inadequate. Methods: All HAI pump insertions from 7/99 to 7/03 requiring SVG conduits (N = 10) were analyzed for arterial anatomy, operative conduct, and outcome. Results: From 1988 through 2005, 124 HAI pumps were placed of which 10 received SVG conduits to optimize placement. Mean operative time was 251 ± 50 min and mean blood loss was 230 ± 30 cm3. All were placed with palliative intent. Three patients (30%) had type 1 anatomy with inadequate GDA. Five (50%) had type 3 anatomy with replaced right hepatic artery, one (10%) had a small GDA originating off the right hepatic artery, and one patient (10%) had a trifurcation. Two (20%) pump-related complications were identified, and only one (10%) was related to vasculature (catheter thrombosis as a result of hepatic arterial stenosis distal to the SVG insertion site). Conclusions: Complication rates related to SVG conduits for hepatic arterial infusion pump placement are low. Saphenous vein grafts are acceptable conduits for patients with abnormal hepatic arterial anatomy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-89
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Surgical Oncology
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2008
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Liver metastases
  • Palliation
  • Regional therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Oncology

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