Sacral radiculopathy due to cement leakage from percutaneous sacroplasty, successfully treated with surgical decompression

Sean M. Barber, Andrew D. Livingston, David A. Cech

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Percutaneous sacroplasty is a procedure adapted from vertebroplasty, which is designed to ameliorate the painful morbidity associated with sacral insufficiency fractures without the invasiveness of open surgery. Early estimates of efficacy, according to several case reports and small series, appear promising, but the procedure is not without risk. Several cases of radiculopathy due to nerve root compression by extravasated polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) have been reported. The authors present a case of radiculopathy caused by cement leakage from sacroplasty, treated with surgical decompression of the compromised nerve root. The patient presented with left S-1 radiculopathy and was found on CT to have a left S-1 nerve root completely encased in PMMA over a portion of its length. The patient underwent sacral laminectomy with the removal of PMMA and experienced pain relief and the return of function postoperatively. Surgical removal of PMMA extravasated during sacroplasty is feasible and should be considered when nerve root compression or canal stenosis causes pain or neurological deficit refractory to conservative therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)524-528
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Spine
Volume18
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Keywords

  • Complication
  • Laminectomy
  • Polymethylmethacrylate
  • Radiculopathy
  • Sacral insufficiency fracture
  • Sacroplasty

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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