Response of free-living adults to behavioral treatment of obesity: Attrition and compliance to exercise

John P. Foreyt, G. Ken Goodrick, Rebecca S. Reeves, A. Scott Raynaud, Linda Darnell, Alan H. Brown, Antonio Gotto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of a behavior modification program were studied in a free-living population of mildly obese adults over a one-year period. A total of 165 subjects were randomly assigned to control or to exercise-only, diet-only, or exercise-plus-diet behavior modification groups. The diet plan consisted of a prudent, reduced-fat regimen. Most subjects chose brisk walking for exercise. After the first 3 months, diet intervention was associated with a significant reduction in weight, percent body fat, and waist circumference. After 12 months, mean weight of the exercise-plus-diet group was lower than that of the exercise-only group. Interpretation of these results is difficult, because many of the subjects failed to adhere to the behavioral recommendations. Problems in treating obese adults without close therapist scrutiny are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)659-669
Number of pages11
JournalBehavior Therapy
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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