Resident Involvement in Microsurgery: An American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Analysis

Kevin T. Jubbal, Daniel Chang, Shayan A. Izaddoost, William Pederson, Dmitry Zavlin, Anthony Echo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: In the current healthcare climate, there is increased focus on medical errors, patient outcomes, and the influence of resident participation on these metrics. Other studies have examined the influence of resident involvement on surgical outcomes, but the arena of microsurgery, with added complexity and learning curve, has yet to be investigated. Design: A retrospective analysis of the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database was performed to find patients undergoing procedures with free tissue transfer by screening for Current Procedural Terminology codes. Primary outcomes measured include flap failure, wound, infectious, and major and minor complications. Setting: This study was conducted at the Methodist Hospital, an academic hospital located in Houston, Texas. Participants: Patients in the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database between the years 2005 and 2012 undergoing microsurgical procedures were included in this analysis. Results: A total of 1466 patients met inclusion criteria. There was a statistically significant association of major complications with age, peripheral vascular disease, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) classification of 3 or greater, total operative time, and year of operation. Multivariate analysis on minor complications demonstrated significant association with ASA class of 3 or 4. Resident involvement was not a significant factor among any outcome measures including major complications, minor complications, flap failure, wound complications, infectious complications, bleeding requiring transfusion, and unexpected reoperation rates within 30 days. Conclusions: This study provides further evidence in support of the claim that resident involvement in microsurgery is safe and effective, with similar rates of major complications, minor complications, flap failure, and unexpected reoperation. High ASA classification and history of peripheral vascular disease were strong predictors of major complications and should be optimized preoperatively before free tissue transfer. Later years were associated with decreased major complication rates, which may be reflective of enhanced supervision standards.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Keywords

  • Clinical aspect of plastic microsurgery
  • Clinical outcomes research
  • Microsurgery
  • Practice-Based Learning and Improvement
  • Resident training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Education

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