Relevance of human papillomavirus screening in management of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

Raymond H. Kaufman, M. D. Ervin Adam, Joseph Icenogle, Herschel Lawsoii, Nancy Lee, Keith O. Reeves, John Irwin, Terry Simon, Muan Press, Robert Uhler, Carol Entman, William C. Reeves

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the utility of human papillomavirus detection in identifying women with abnormal Papanicolaou smears who can be safely followed up with cytologie study only, we conducted a study to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values of a Food and Drug Administration-approved human papillomavirus test kit for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in colposcopically directed biopsy specimens. STUDY DESIGN: We enrolled women with abnormal Papanicolaou smears referred to a colposcopy clinic serving indigent patients. All 1128 women had a referral Papanicolaou smear, a clinic Papanicolaou smear, and a sample for human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid test; 1075 underwent colposcopically directed biopsies and endocervical curettage. We used the HPV Profile kit for human papillomavirus testing. RESULTS: Of 486 women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions on Papanicolaou smear, 35.4% had high-risk human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid detected, and of 592 with high-grade lesions, 44.4% had high-risk human papillomavirus detected. Among 527 women with biopsy specimens showing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and in 267 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2 or 3, 38.7% and 56.2% had high-risk human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid detected. However, the sensitivity of human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid detection to identify biopsy-confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2 or 3 was 55.7%, and the positive predictive value of the test was only 34.9%. CONCLUSION: Human papillomavirus appears to be causally associated with cervical cancer but human papillomavirus screening does not appear to be of value to identify women with abnormal Papanicolaou smears who can be safely followed up with cytologie study alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-92
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume176
Issue number1 I
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

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