Relationship between serum bilirubin levels s and the progression of renal function in patients with chronic kidney disease and hyperuricemia

Mengyuan Li, Xinhua Li, Yan Liu, Xinying Liu, Yaxiang Song, Jian Zhao, Chandra Mohan, Tianfu Wu, Ai Peng, Ling Qin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is known that inflammation and oxidative stress have strong influences on chronic kidney disease (CKD). As an antioxidant, bilirubin is currently under extensive scrutiny. However, there are disagreements with regard to the oxidative and antioxidative roles of serum uric acid (SUA). This study aimed to investigate the relationship between serum bilirubin and the progression of renal function in CKD patients with hyperuricemia (HUA). This retrospective longitudinal study included 427 CKD patients. The endpoint was renal replacement therapy or death. Patients were divided into the following two groups according to the SUA level: HUA group (SUA ≥ 420 μmol/L for men; SUA ≥ 360 μmol/L for women) and normal uric acid level (NUA) group. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate the risk factors for renal outcomes in the two patient groups. The median follow-up time was 36 months. In the Cox regression analysis, the risk of renal outcomes in patients with serum indirect bilirubin (IBIL) levels >4.55 μmol/L was 0.15 times the risk in patients with serum IBIL levels ≤4.55 μmol/L (hazard ratio = 0.15, p =.013). Our findings suggest that a high serum IBIL level might be a protective factor for the progression of renal function in CKD patients with HUA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)156-161
Number of pages6
JournalClinica Chimica Acta
Volume486
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Hyperuricemia
  • Oxidative stress
  • Renal outcomes
  • Serum bilirubin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Biochemistry, medical

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