Relations between the underlying dimensions of PTSD and major depression using an epidemiological survey of deployed Ohio National Guard soldiers

Tracey L. Biehn, Ateka Contractor, Jon D. Elhai, Marijo Tamburrino, Thomas H. Fine, Marta R. Prescott, Edwin Shirley, Philip K. Chan, Renee Slembarski, Israel Liberzon, Joseph R. Calabrese, Sandro Galea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: In the present study, the authors investigated the relationship between the underlying symptom dimensions of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and dimensions of major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: A sample of 1266 Ohio National Guard soldiers with a history of overseas deployment participated and were administered the PTSD Checklist (assessing PTSD) and Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (assessing depression). Results: Using confirmatory factor analysis, results demonstrated that both PTSD's dysphoria and hyperarousal factors were more related to depression's somatic than non-somatic factor. Furthermore, depression's somatic factor was more related to PTSD's dysphoria than hyperarousal factor. Limitations: Limitations of this study include the use of self-report measures and a predominately male military sample. Conclusions: Results indicate that PTSD's dysphoria factor is related to depression specifically by way of depression's somatic construct. Given PTSD's substantial dysphoria/distress component, these results have implications for understanding the nature of PTSD's high comorbidity with depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-111
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Affective Disorders
Volume144
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2013

Keywords

  • Comorbidity
  • Factor analysis
  • Major depressive disorder
  • Military veterans
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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