Quantification of the aortic regurgitant volume with magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping: A clinical investigation of the importance of imaging slice location

George P. Chatzimavroudis, John N. Oshinski, Robert H. Franch, Roderic I. Pettigrew, Peter G. Walker, Ajit P. Yoganathan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background and aims of the study: Current techniques for assessment of aortic regurgitation (AR) are mainly qualitative. Magnetic resonance phase velocity mapping (PVM) provides accurate measurements of arterial blood blow. In AR, the aortic regurgitant volume (ARV) can be quantified with a single imaging slice measurement in the ascending aorta. The aim was to use PVM to: (i) quantify the regurgitant volume in patients with AR using an in vitro validated technique; and (ii) confirm in vivo our previous in vitro findings of the importance of measurement location. Methods: Four healthy volunteers and 19 patients with AR, varying from mild to severe, were examined in a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. In 13 patients, the slice was placed: (i) between the aortic valve and the coronary ostia; (ii) at the sinotubular junction (SJ); and (iii) 2 cm above the SJ. In six patients, one measurement was taken as close as technically possible to the aortic valve. PVM measurements of the ARV were compared with angiographic/echocardiographic AR grading. Results: No ARV was measured in healthy subjects. In patients, PVM results correlated well with angiographic/echocardiographic data. Repeatability of the PVM results was excellent and interobserver variability very small. The measured ARV decreased as the slice distance from the aortic valve increased, due to aortic compliance, in agreement to previous in vitro results. Close to the valve, acceleration did not affect the accuracy of velocity measurements. Conclusions: PVM has great potential to measure AR in a purely quantitative manner. Measurement location is important and results suggest that the closer the measurement to the valve the more accurate the ARV quantification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)94-101
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Heart Valve Disease
Volume7
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1998

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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