Quantification of S. aureus adhesion to fibronectin using optical tweezers

Kathryn H. Simpson, M. Gabriela Bowden, Magnus Höök, Bahman Anvari

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Biomaterial infection, a common cause of medical device failure, is initiated by bacterial adhesion to an adsorbed protein layer on the implant surface. This adhesion is thought to be mediated by specific molecules present on the bacterial cell surface. We have used optical tweezers to measure the adhesive force between a single bacterium and a protein-coated surface. A bacterium was optically trapped and brought in contact with a 10-μm diameter polystyrene microsphere coated with fibronectin. The minimum force required to detach the cell from the bead was determined over a range of fibronectin concentrations. The detachment forces were integer multiples of a 25-pN base value that was independent of coating concentration; we propose that the variation in force is related to the number of bonds formed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAnnual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
Pages2277-2278
Number of pages2
Volume3
StatePublished - 2002
EventProceedings of the 2002 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 24th Annual Conference and the 2002 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES / EMBS) - Houston, TX, United States
Duration: Oct 23 2002Oct 26 2002

Other

OtherProceedings of the 2002 IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology 24th Annual Conference and the 2002 Fall Meeting of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES / EMBS)
CountryUnited States
CityHouston, TX
Period10/23/0210/26/02

Keywords

  • Bacterial adhesion
  • Biofilm
  • Extracellular matrix
  • Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Bioengineering

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