Pushing the envelope-nonmyeloablative and reduced intensity preparative regimens for allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation

S R Pingali, R E Champlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) was originally developed to allow delivery of myeloablative doses of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. With better understanding of disease pathophysiology, the graft vs malignancy (GVM) effect of allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation and toxicities associated with myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimens, the focus shifted to developing less toxic conditioning regimens to reduce treatment-related morbidity without compromising survival. Although HCT with MAC is preferred to reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) for most patients ⩽60 years with AML/myelodysplastic syndrome and ALL, RIC and nonmyeloablative (NMA) regimens allow HCT for many otherwise ineligible patients. Reduced intensity preparative regimens have produced high rates of PFS for diagnoses, which are highly sensitive to GVM. Relapse of the malignancy is the major cause of treatment failure with RIC/NMA HCT. Incorporation of novel agents like bortezomib or lenalidomide, addition of cellular immunotherapy and use of targeted radiation therapies could further improve outcome. In this review, we discuss commonly used RIC/NMA regimens and promising novel regimens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1157-67
Number of pages11
JournalBone Marrow Transplantation
Volume50
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2015

Keywords

  • Allografts
  • Bortezomib
  • Chemoradiotherapy
  • Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
  • Hematopoietic Stem Cells
  • Humans
  • Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute
  • Myelodysplastic Syndromes
  • Thalidomide
  • Transplantation Conditioning
  • Journal Article
  • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
  • Review

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