Purification of a skeletal muscle polypeptide which stimulates choline acetyltransferase activity in cultured spinal cord neurons

J. L. McManaman, F. G. Crawford, S. S. Stewart, S. H. Appel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

59 Scopus citations

Abstract

Extracts of rat skeletal muscle contain neurotrophic factors which stimulate the development of choline acetyltransferase in embryonic day 14 rat spinal cord cultures. The trophic activity does not bind heparin-Sepharose or lectin affinity columns. However, mild acid treatment separates the trophic activity into soluble and insoluble fractions. The acid-insoluble activity has been purified 5000-fold to apparent homogeneity using preparative sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis to achieve final purification. The purified factor migrates as a single band on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing, with an apparent molecular mass of 20 kDa and a pI of 4.8. The activity and apparent molecular weight of the purified factor are unaltered by treatment with reducing agents or incubation in acidic conditions. Activity, however, is destroyed by heating or protease treatment. Thus, the factor appears to be a single polypeptide without significant levels of glycosylation or charge microheterogeneity. These results represent the first purification of a neurotrophic factor from skeletal muscle. The physical properties and amino acid composition of this factor differ from those of nerve growth factor and heparin-binding growth factors, as well as from the neurotrophic factor from heart cell conditioned medium which induces cholinergic development in sympathetic neurons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5890-5897
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume263
Issue number12
StatePublished - 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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