Pulmonary retransplantation: Does the indication for operation influence postoperative lung function?

R. J. Novick, L. Stitt, H. J. Schafers, B. Andreassian, P. Duchatelle, W. Klepetko, R. L. Hardesty, A. Frost, G. A. Patterson, B. A. Reitz, S. Keshavjee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: An international series of pulmonary retransplantation was updated to determine the factors associated with pulmonary function, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome stage, and survival after operation. Methods: One hundred sixty patients underwent retransplantation in 35 centers from 1985 to 1995. Logistic regression methods were used to determine variables associated with 3-month and 2-year survival after retransplantation. Values of forced expiratory volume in 1 second were contrasted between groups by unpaired, two-tailed t tests. Results: The median follow-up in surviving recipients was 780 days. Actuarial survival was 45% ± 4%, 41% ± 4%, and 33% ± 4% at 1, 2, and 3 years, respectively. On multivariable analysis, the only predictor of 3-month survival was preoperative ambulatory status (p = 0.005), whereas center experience with at least five pulmonary retransplantations was the sole predictor of 2-year survival (p = 0.04). The prevalence of stage 3 (severe) bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome was 12% at 1 year, 15% at 2 years, and 33% at 3 years after retransplantation. Retransplant recipients with stage 3 bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome at 1 year had a significantly worse actuarial survival than those with stages 0 to 2 (p < 0.01). By 3 years after retransplantation, the forced expiratory volume in 1 second was significantly lower in patients who underwent reoperation because of obliterative bronchiolitis than in patients who underwent retransplantation because of acute graft failure or an airway complication (p = 0.02). Only 31% of patients who underwent retransplantation because of obliterative bronchiolitis were free of bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome at 3 years versus 83% of patients who underwent retransplantation because of other indications (p = 0.02). Conclusions: Preoperative ambulatory status predicts early survival and center volume predicts intermediate-term outcome after retransplantation. Improved management strategies are necessary to prevent the development of progressive graft dysfunction after retransplantation for obliterative bronchiolitis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1504-1514
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume112
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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