Prognostic value of preoperative peripheral monocyte count in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation

Qing Qi Ren, Shun Jun Fu, Qiang Zhao, Zhi Yong Guo, Fei Ji, Mao Gen Chen, Lin Wei Wu, Xiaoshun He

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Prognostic value of peripheral monocyte, as a member of inflammatory cells, was widely being investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who underwent liver transplantation (LT) and the relationship between monocyte count and tumor-related characteristics. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical data of 101 HCC patients after LT. Preoperative monocyte count and demographic, clinical, and pathologic data were analyzed. The optimal cutoff value of monocyte count was 456/mm3, with the sensitivity and specificity of 69.4 and 61.5 %, respectively. Elevated preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count was significantly associated with large tumor size. The 1-, 3-, and 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) (80.9, 70.1, and 53.3 % vs 55.1, 38.7, and 38.7 %, P = 0.007) and overall survival (OS) rates (95.7, 76.6, and 64.8 % vs 72.2, 44.1, and 36.1 %, P = 0.002) of HCC patients in the peripheral blood monocyte count ≤456/mm3 group were higher than those in the peripheral blood monocyte count >456/mm3 group. In conclusion, elevated preoperative peripheral blood monocyte count was significantly associated with advanced tumor stage and it can be considered as a prognostic factor for HCC patients after LT.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8973-8978
Number of pages6
JournalTumor Biology
Volume37
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016

Keywords

  • Hepatocellular carcinoma
  • Liver transplantation
  • Peripheral blood monocyte count
  • Prognosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

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