Production of discrete changes in dopamine and noradrenaline levels and turnover in various parts of the rat brain following exposure to xylene, ortho-, meta-, and para-xylene, and ethylbenzene

Kurt Andersson, Kjell Fuxe, Odd G. Nilsen, Rune Toftgård, Peter Eneroth, Jan-Ake Gustafsson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

Subacute exposure of male rats to high concentrations (2000 ppm) of xylene, ortho-xylene, meta-xylene, para-xylene, and ethylbenzene produced discrete increases of dopamine and noradrenaline levels and turnover in various parts of the hypothalamus and the median eminence 16-18 hr following the last exposure to the aromatic hydrocarbons. Some of the above solvents also reduced the secretion of prolactin, corticosterone, and thyroid-stimulating hormone. Within the forebrain, only xylene produced increases of dopamine levels in various parts of the striatum and the subcortical limbic forebrain. Furthermore, only xylene itself produced widespread increases of dopamine turnover within the neostriatum and the subcortical limbic forebrain, while ethylbenzene selectively increased dopamine turnover within the dopamine-cholecystokinin-8 immunoreactive nerve terminals of the nucleus accumbens (posterior part). In contrast ortho-xylene produced widespread reductions of dopamine turnover in the above-mentioned areas. It is suggested that the changes discovered in dopamine and noradrenaline levels and turnover can produce disturbances in catecholamine neurotransmission in the brain leading to disturbed brain function, e.g., in neuroendocrine, mental, and motor control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)535-548
Number of pages14
JournalToxicology and Applied Pharmacology
Volume60
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 30 1981

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology
  • Pharmacology

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