Prevention of rotavirus disease: Updated guidelines for use of rotavirus vaccine

Joseph A. Bocchini, John S. Bradley, Michael T. Brady, Henry H. Bernstein, Carrie L. Byington, Penelope H. Dennehy, Margaret C. Fisher, Robert W. Frenck, Mary P. Glode, Harry L. Keyserling, David W. Kimberlin, Walter A. Orenstein, Lorry G. Rubin, Beth P. Bell, Robert Bortolussi, Richard D. Clover, Marc A. Fischer, Richard L. Gorman, Lucia Lee, Jennifer S. ReadBenjamin Schwartz, Jeffrey R. Starke, Edgar O. Ledbetter, H. Cody Meissner, Larry K. Pickering, Carol J. Baker, Sarah S. Long, Jennifer Frantz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

84 Scopus citations

Abstract

This statement updates and replaces the 2007 American Academy of Pediatrics statement for prevention of rotavirus gastroenteritis. In February 2006, a live oral human-bovine reassortant rotavirus vaccine (RV5 [RotaTeq]) was licensed as a 3-dose series for use in infants in the United States. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommended routine use of RV5 in infants in the United States. In April 2008, a live, oral, human attenuated rotavirus vaccine (RV1 [Rotarix]) was licensed as a 2-dose series for use in infants in the United States. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends routine immunization of infants in the United States with rotavirus vaccine. The American Academy of Pediatrics does not express a preference for either RV5 or RV1. RV5 is to be administered orally in a 3-dose series with doses administered at 2, 4, and 6 months of age; RV1 is to be administered orally in a 2-dose series with doses administered at 2 and 4 months of age. The first dose of rotavirus vaccine should be administered from 6 weeks through 14 weeks, 6 days of age. The minimum interval between doses of rotavirus vaccine is 4 weeks. All doses should be administered by 8 months, 0 days of age. Recommendations in this statement also address the maximum ages for doses, contraindications, precautions, and special situations for administration of rotavirus vaccine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1412-1420
Number of pages9
JournalPediatrics
Volume123
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2009

Keywords

  • Rotavirus gastroenteritis
  • Rotavirus vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Prevention of rotavirus disease: Updated guidelines for use of rotavirus vaccine'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this