Prevalence of variant brachial-basilic vein anatomy and implications for vascular access planning

Javier E. Anaya-Ayala, Houssam K. Younes, Christy L. Kaiser, Obaid Syed, Nyla Ismail, Joseph J. Naoum, Mark G. Davies, Eric K. Peden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To describe and increase understanding of the brachial-basilic vein anatomy that could impact planning of long-term hemodialysis access procedures. Methods: Preoperative vein mapping was conducted in a cross-sectional, observational study in end-stage renal disease patients from August 2005 to May 2010. "Traditional" anatomic description with basilic-brachial junction at the axillary level with paired brachial veins was classified as "Type 1." Junctions observed at the mid or lower portions of the upper arm with duplication of the brachial vein above that level were classified as "Type 2." Junctions at the mid and lower portions of the upper arm with no duplication of the brachial vein above that level were classified as "Type 3." Results: Two hundred ninety patients (mean age, 56 ± 17 years; 52% men) were observed and 426 arms mapped (221 right, 205 left). The prevalence of variations in venous arm anatomy was as follows: Type 1: 66%; Type 2: 17%; and Type 3: 17%. Conclusions: This study underscores the need for heightened awareness of upper arm venous variations and advocates the regular use of preoperative ultrasound imaging. We propose that recognition of Type 3 anatomy may have implications in access algorithm and planning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)720-724
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Vascular Surgery
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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