Preoperative Depression Is Negatively Associated With Function and Predicts Poorer Outcomes After Hip Arthroscopy for Femoroacetabular Impingement

Kyle R. Sochacki, Lindsey Brown, Kathleen Cenkus, Stephanie Di Stasi, Joshua D. Harris, Thomas J. Ellis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: (1) To determine the prevalence of depression in patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) syndrome and (2) to determine whether depression has a statistically significant and clinically relevant effect on preoperative and postoperative patient-reported outcome scores. Methods: Consecutive subjects undergoing hip arthroscopy for FAI syndrome were retrospectively reviewed. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), Hip Outcome Score (HOS), and 33-item International Hip Outcome Tool (iHOT-33) were administered preoperatively and postoperatively. Clinically relevant differences were defined by the minimal clinically important difference, substantial clinical benefit, and patient acceptable symptom state. Comparisons between preoperative and postoperative scores were completed. The Spearman correlation coefficient (r) was used to determine the degree of correlation between the BDI-II score, HOS, and iHOT-33 score preoperatively and postoperatively. Results: We analyzed 77 patients (72.7% female patients; mean age, 35.2 ± 12.5 years). Depressive symptoms were reported as minimal (75.3%), mild (11.7%), moderate (6.5%), or severe (6.5%). Patients with minimal or mild depression had a superior HOS Activities of Daily Living (Δ17.3 preoperatively [P <.001] and Δ37.8 postoperatively [P <.001]), HOS Sport-Specific Subscore (Δ12.8 preoperatively [P =.002] and Δ52.1 postoperatively [P <.0001]), and iHOT-33 score (Δ15.4 preoperatively [P <.0001] and Δ51.3 postoperatively [P <.0001]) compared with patients with moderate or severe depression. There was a weak to moderate negative correlation between the BDI-II score and iHOT-33 score (r = −0.4614, P <.0001 preoperatively; r = −0.327, P <.0001 at 1 year), HOS Activities of Daily Living (r = −0.531, P <.0001 preoperatively), and HOS Sport-Specific Subscore (r = −0.379, P <.0017 at 1 year). Conclusions: Most patients undergoing hip arthroscopy for FAI have minimal depressive symptoms with the overall prevalence higher than the general population. Patients with minimal or mild depressive symptoms have statistically and clinically better preoperative and postoperative patient-reported outcomes, are more likely to obtain substantial clinical benefit from surgery, and are more likely to reach a patient acceptable symptom state after surgery than patients with moderate to severe depressive symptoms. Level of Evidence: Level III, case-control study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2368-2374
Number of pages7
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume34
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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