Preferred smoking cessation methods for Asian or Pacific Islander household smokers who live with hospitalized children.

Meta T. Lee, Jennifer Bracamontes, Evan Mosier, James Davis, Jay E. Maddock

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

A qualitative study was conducted to determine preferred smoking cessation methods among Asian or Pacific Islander (API) smokers who live with hospitalized children. This study occurred in a children's hospital where a new cessation program would be developed. Twenty-six API smokers who live with children admitted to the hospital were interviewed and tape-recorded. Responses to survey questions were transcribed, categorized, and analyzed. 73% were interested in quitting, 34% within the next 30 days. Few would independently use the quit-line (31%) or attend group classes (4%). However, if offered during their child's hospitalization, 52% would sign up for individualized counseling and 29% would attend group sessions. Respondents believed advice would be helpful from their physician (71%), child's pediatrician (65%, nurse (64%), respiratory therapist (65%), or smoking cessation counselor (75%). The majority of API smokers were interested in quitting and receptive to one-on-one counseling. Advice would be helpful from any healthcare professional. Hawaii Medical Journal

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)48-51
Number of pages4
JournalHawaii medical journal
Volume70
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Preferred smoking cessation methods for Asian or Pacific Islander household smokers who live with hospitalized children.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this