Preclinical study testing feasibility and technical requirements for successful telerobotic long distance peripheral vascular intervention

Peter Legeza, Kalyna Sconzert, John Michael Sungur, Thomas M. Loh, Gavin Britz, Alan Lumsden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Robotic-assisted endovascular surgery enables us to perform interventions from long distances. This study evaluates the workflow and telecommunication requirements of telerobotic peripheral vascular interventions. Methods: Ten superficial femoral artery cases were performed by the operator being 44 miles away from the interventional suite, with an endovascular robotic system, on a high-fidelity endovascular simulator. Procedural success, technical success, fluoroscopy time, residual stenosis, contrast dose and network delay were registered. Communication success was assessed after each procedure on a scale from 1 (unacceptable) to 5 (ideal). Results: Procedural success and technical success were 100% and 80%, respectively. The mean residual stenosis, fluoroscopy time and contrast dose were 1.7 ± 5.25%, 6.5 ± 1.8 min and 58.8 ± 14.8 ml. The mean network latency was 38.9 ± 3.5 ms. Median communication success scores were 4.5 (min: 4, max: 5) reported by both the operator and the bedside technician on a scale of 1 (unacceptable) to 5 (ideal). Conclusion: With a stable network connection and good communication protocol, a high success rate was achieved for remote robotic-assisted peripheral vascular intervention in an ex vivo model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere2249
JournalInternational Journal of Medical Robotics and Computer Assisted Surgery
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Keywords

  • CorPath
  • endovascular
  • peripheral vascular intervention
  • remote intervention
  • robotic-assisted and telerobotic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Biophysics
  • Computer Science Applications

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