Post hoc analysis of data from two clinical trials evaluating the minimal clinically important change in international restless legs syndrome sum score in patients with restless legs syndrome (willis-ekbom disease)

William G. Ondo, Frank Grieger, Kimberly Moran, Ralf Kohnen, Thomas Roth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Study Objectives: Determine the minimal clinically important change (MCIC), a measure determining the minimum change in scale score perceived as clinically beneficial, for the international restless legs syndrome (IRLS) and restless legs syndrome 6-item questionnaire (RLS-6) in patients with moderate to severe restless legs syndrome (RLS/Willis-Ekbom disease) treated with the rotigotine transdermal system. Methods: This post hoc analysis analyzed data from two 6-mo randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled studies (SP790 [NCT00136045]; SP792 [NCT00135993]) individually and as a pooled analysis in rotigotine-treated patients, with baseline and end of maintenance IRLS and Clinical Global Impressions of change (CGI Item 2) scores available for analysis. An anchor-based approach and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to determine the MCIC for the IRLS and RLS-6. We specifically compared "much improved vs minimally improved, much improved/very much improved vs minimally improved or worse, and minimally improved or better vs no change or worse on the CGI-2 using the full analysis set (data as observed). Results: The MCIC IRLS cut-off scores for SP790 and SP792 were similar. Using the pooled SP790+SP792 analysis, the MCIC total IRLS cut-off score (sensitivity, specificity) for "much improved vs minimally improved" was-9 (0.69, 0.66), for "much improved/very much improved vs minimally improved or worse" was-11 (0.81, 0.84), and for "minimally improved or better vs no change or worse" was-9 (0.79, 0.88). MCIC ROC cut-offs were also calculated for each RLS-6 item. Conclusions: In patients with RLS, the MCIC values derived in the current analysis provide a basis for defining meaningful clinical improvement based on changes in the IRLS and RLS-6 following treatment with rotigotine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)63-70
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Keywords

  • Clinical study
  • Dopamine agonist
  • IRLS
  • Minimal clinically important change
  • RLS-6
  • Restless legs syndrome
  • Rotigotine
  • Sleep disturbance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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