Pleuropulmonary fibrosis after long-term treatment with the dopamine agonist pergolide for Parkinson disease

Ron Tintner, Prasad Manian, Polly Gauthier, Joseph Jankovic

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dopamine agonists are increasingly used in the treatment of Parkinson disease, but they may cause serious adverse effects. In December 1983, symptoms of Parkinson disease developed in a 55-year-old man with no history of pulmonary disease, smoking, or asbestos exposure. He began treatment with dopamine agonists bromocriptine mesylate (in 1984) and pergolide mesylate (in 1989). In late 2000, pulmonary symptoms developed. Chest radiographs and computed tomographic findings showed a mass in the right upper lobe and effusion. A biopsy specimen showed pleural and parenchymal fibrosis. This syndrome resolved after cessation of pergolide therapy and a switch to pramipexole dihydrochloride. This case draws attention to the association of long-term ergot dopamine agonist therapy with pleuropulmonary fibrosis, which can develop as late as 11 years after the initiation of therapy. We also review evidence that the risk of this complication is substantially lower with the newer nonergot dopamine agonists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1290-1295
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of neurology
Volume62
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pleuropulmonary fibrosis after long-term treatment with the dopamine agonist pergolide for Parkinson disease'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this