Platelet-Rich Plasma, Bone Marrow Aspirate Concentrate, and Hyaluronic Acid Injections Outperform Corticosteroids in Pain and Function Scores at a Minimum of 6 Months as Intra-Articular Injections for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Systematic Review and Network Meta-analysis

Harkirat Jawanda, Zeeshan A. Khan, Alec A. Warrier, Alexander J. Acuña, Sachin Allahabadi, Daniel J. Kaplan, Ethan Ritz, Garrett R. Jackson, Enzo S. Mameri, Anjay Batra, Grant Dornan, Jennifer Westrick, Nikhil N. Verma, Jorge Chahla

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: To compare the efficacy of common intra-articular injections used in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis, including corticosteroid (CS), hyaluronic acid (HA), platelet-rich plasma (PRP), and bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC), with a minimum follow-up of 6-months. Methods: A literature search was conducted using the 2020 Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines in August 2022 in the following databases: PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, Cochrane Database of Controlled Trials, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Level I to II randomized clinical trials with a minimum follow-up of 6 months that investigated the treatments of interest were included. Patient-reported outcome scores for pain and function at baseline and at latest follow-up were extracted, and the change in scores was converted to uniform 0 to 100 scales. Arm-based Bayesian network meta-analysis using a random-effects model was created to compare the treatment arms in pain and function. Results: Forty-eight studies comprising a total of 9,338 knees were included. The most studied intra-articular injection was HA (40.9%), followed by placebo (26.2%), PRP (21.5%), CS (8.8%), and then BMAC (2.5%). HA and PRP both led to a significant improvement in pain compared with placebo. HA, PRP, and BMAC all led to a significant improvement in function scores when compared with placebo. Surface under the cumulative ranking curves (SUCRAs) of the interventions revealed that PRP, BMAC, and HA were the treatments with the highest likelihood of improvement in both pain and function, with overall SUCRA scores of 91.54, 76.46, and 53.12, respectively. The overall SUCRA scores for CS and placebo were 15.18 and 13.70, respectively. Conclusions: At a minimum 6-month follow-up, PRP demonstrated significantly improved pain and function for patients with knee osteoarthritis compared with placebo. Additionally, PRP exhibited the highest SUCRA values for these outcomes when compared with BMAC, HA, and CS. Level of Evidence: Level II, meta-analysis of Level I to II studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1623-1636.e1
JournalArthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2024

Keywords

  • Humans
  • Osteoarthritis, Knee/drug therapy
  • Platelet-Rich Plasma
  • Hyaluronic Acid/administration & dosage
  • Injections, Intra-Articular
  • Adrenal Cortex Hormones/administration & dosage
  • Network Meta-Analysis
  • Pain Measurement
  • Viscosupplements/administration & dosage
  • Bone Marrow Transplantation
  • Treatment Outcome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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