Persistent bacteremia due to coagulase-negative staphylococci in low birth weight neonates

C. C. Patrick, Sheldon Kaplan, C. J. Baker, J. T. Parisi, Edward Mason

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

43 Scopus citations

Abstract

During a 6-month period in 1987, 13 low birth weight neonates without indwelling central intravascular catheters had persistent (positive blood cultures for ≥ 6 days) coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia despite adequate antibiotic therapy. Daily blood cultures remained persistently positive for a mean of 13 days (range 6 to 25 days). This group of infants was compared with other low birth weight infants with similar birth weights and nonpersistent coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia, defined as two or more positive blood cultures accompanied by supporting clinical manifestations of sepsis. During this period, coagulase-negative staphylococcal represented 29% of all bacteremias, and 33% of coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremias were persistent. Other than soft tissue abscesses, none of the infants with persistent coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia had a defined focus of infection. Abdominal distention (P = .001) and thrombocytopenia (P < .03) occurred significantly more frequently in the patients with persistent coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia than in those with nonpersistent bacteremia. Of the 13 patients with persistent coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia, 2 received methicillin and 11 received vancomycin. No antibiotic tolerance to either antibiotic could be demonstrated. Serum concentrations of vancomycin far exceeded the minimum bactericidal concentration in all cases in which vancomycin was prescribed. No in vitro differences could be demonstrated between persistent and nonpersistent coagulase-negative staphylococcal strains for slime production, biotype, proteins from modified whole cell lysates developed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and opsonophagocytosis by adult neutrophils in the presence of pooled human sera. Additionally, plasmid profile analysis and phage typing revealed no common strain causing the persistent bacteremia. The pathogenesis of persistent coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia in low birth weight neonates without intravascular catheters remains obscure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)977-985
Number of pages9
JournalPediatrics
Volume84
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1989

Keywords

  • coagulase-negative staphylococcal bacteremia
  • low birth weight neonate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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