Perception of different frequencies of cranial transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in normal and HIV-positive individuals.

D. N. Taylor, J. G. Wallace, J. C. Masdeu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Sine-wave transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) of varying frequencies applied across the cranium (ear to ear) has been demonstrated to evoke three different noncutaneous sensations in three discrete, nonoverlapping frequency bands in normal, healthy subjects. This report describes two studies which evaluate perception of these cranial TENS-evoked, frequency-dependent sensations in normal and HIV-positive individuals. In Exp. I, all of 50 normal, healthy subjects reported perceiving the same three noncutaneous sensations in the same three nonoverlapping frequency bands as long as stimulated and over repeated trials. In Exp. II, 34 HIV-positive individuals (14 asymptomatic, 9 ARC, 11 AIDS) who were free of neurological symptoms differed significantly from 10 normal, healthy controls, and from the norms observed in Exp. I, on perception of the three different TENS-evoked sensations. Also, inability to maintain perception of the stimulus over repeated trials, observed only in the HIV-positive individuals, increased significantly with severity of HIV infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-264
Number of pages6
JournalPerceptual and motor skills
Volume74
Issue number1
StatePublished - Feb 1 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Sensory Systems

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