Partially reassembled high density lipoproteins. Effects on cholesterol flux, synthesis, and esterification in normal human skin fibroblasts

M. Picardo, J. B. Massey, D. E. Kuhn, A. M. Gotto, S. H. Gianturco, H. J. Pownall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of a partially reassembled high density lipoprotein (PR-HDL) prepared by a detergent removal method on the cholesterol metabolism of fibroblasts has been tested under conditions of lipid depletion. The PR-HDL were composed of apolipoprotein A-I (1 mol) from human plasma HDL, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) 100 mol, and varying amounts of cholesterol. Below 15 mol%, the PR-HDL effected a net efflux of cholesterol from the fibroblasts; as a consequence, the activities of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and acyl coenzyme A acyltransferase, respectively, were increased and decreased. Above 15 mol% cholesterol in the PR-HDL, net influx of cholesterol was observed and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase activity was decreased, while acylcoenzyme A acyltransferase activity was increased. The uptake of several phosphatidylcholines, apo A-I, and cholesterol were measured as a function of time. The rates of lipid transfer to the cells decreased with increasing hydrophobicity of the transferring lipid. By contrast, in parallel experiments a relatively small quantity of 125I apo A-I was associated with the cells. Our results suggest that a component of lipid transfer from PR-HDL to fibroblasts occurs via monomeric transfer through the aqueous phase that is independent of apo A-I binding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)434-441
Number of pages8
JournalArteriosclerosis
Volume6
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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